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Pre-emptive epidural analgesia for acute and chronic post-thoracotomy pain in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis
  1. Sun-Kyung Park1,2,
  2. Susie Yoon1,2,
  3. Bo Rim Kim1,2,
  4. Suk Hyung Choe1,2,
  5. Jae-Hyon Bahk1,2 and
  6. Jeong-Hwa Seo1,2
  1. 1 Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  2. 2 Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  1. Correspondence to Dr Jeong-Hwa Seo, Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of); eong77{at}snu.ac.kr

Abstract

Background and objectives Epidural analgesia is the gold standard for post-thoracotomy pain management and can be started before or after surgical incision. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated whether pre-emptive epidural analgesia before thoracotomy incision reduces acute and chronic post-thoracotomy pain in adults compared with epidural analgesia after incision.

Methods We searched databases including MEDLINE, Embase, and CENTRAL for randomized controlled trials comparing epidural analgesia initiated before (pre-emptive group) and after (control group) thoracotomy incision in adults. The primary outcomes were the pain intensity during rest and coughing within 72 hours after surgery and the incidence of pain 1 to 6 months after surgery. Data were combined with random-effects meta-analyses. We rated the quality of evidence as high, moderate, low, and very low using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) method.

Results We included 19 trials with 1062 participants involving 529 in the pre-emptive group and 533 in the control group. The pain intensity was significantly lower at rest within 72 hours after surgery (19 studies, n=1062) and during coughing within 48 hours after surgery (11 studies, n=638), and the incidence of pain was significantly lower 1 to 6 months after surgery (6 studies, n=276) in the pre-emptive group than in the control group. The quality of evidence was moderate or low in the primary outcomes.

Conclusions Our review provides low-quality evidence that pre-emptive epidural analgesia reduces the intensity of acute pain and the incidence of chronic pain after thoracotomy in adults.

Protocol registration number CRD42019131620.

  • pain
  • postoperative
  • analgesia
  • chronic pain
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Footnotes

  • Contributors Study conception and design: SKP, SY, JHB, and JHS. Literature search: SKP and SY. Acquisition of data: SKP and SY. Assessment of bias: SKP and SY. Data analysis: SKP, BRK, and SHC. Drafting manuscript: SKP, JHB, and JHS. Revising manuscript: All authors.

  • Funding This work was supported by the research fund of Seoul National University Hospital (Grant number: 2320170070).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as supplementary information. All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as supplementary information. All data can be obtained from the included studies.

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